Posted By Anna
What does home mean to you?

That was the question that the Loading Docs team asked film makers late last year, and the resulting 67 short doco proposals they received were so varied they almost couldn’t be compared – everyone had a different way of showing Aotearoa to the world. From that bunch, 10 were picked to receive NZ on Air and NZ Film Commission funding, and set to the task of match funding the rest through us over the month of February.

The Loading Docs team did a fabulous job of supporting the film makers in January to get their pitches together, and I spent some time with them at their workshop giving them tips and tricks on how to do crowdfunding well – with one of our successes, Karl from Dregs.

The projects launched Monday, and in just under three days one has been funded, and overall they’ve raised almost 40% of their goal.

Want to meet the film makers? Check out their pitches below, and click here to see how they’re going on campaigns.

Loading Docs - Class of 2014

“The Road to Whakarae” By Aaron Smart and Tim Worrall

The Road to Whakarae winds deep into the Urewera Ranges where kaumatua, Beam Titoko is putting on his best cowboy hat and boots, digging out his classic Gibson guitar and preparing to sing a waiata to call his whānau back home.  An affectionate portrait of a Tūhoe community by Tūhoe filmmakers, The Road to Whakarae celebrates the simple lifestyles and closeness of whānau who have stayed on their traditional lands to keep their home fires burning.

Living Like a King by Zoe MacIntosh

The disaster of the Christchurch Earthquake left the majority of its population devastated but for a small group of homeless people, the earthquake meant new and luxurious living opportunities. Living like a King is an intimate portrait of one of Christchurch’s oldest Streeties (Aka Cowboy) and his unexpected taste of what its like to live like a King.

Today by Loom Films

From the last resident going to bed to the first person rising, Today follows the passing of time for residents and workers of a South Auckland rest home and offers an evocative insight into a place many New Zealanders call ‘home’.

‘Wayne’ By Kirsty Griffin and Vivienne Kernick

For Wayne, a profoundly intellectually disabled man, living with others has always been fraught with conflict, but at 44 he has finally been given a home of is own. With this space Wayne is now ready to begin the rest of his life.

Queer Selfies By Robyn & Paula

Coming out is one thing, coming home another. Home is a complex concept to anyone of an ‘alternative’ sexuality, with its connotations of place, identity and security. In this film, a diverse range of the queer community talk to a self-operated camera about their personal experiences; sharing stories which are moving, humorous and compelling.

The Jump By Alex Sutherland

With a healthy mix of imagination, balls and rough Newtonian physics, a kiwi bloke jumped off a bridge in 1980, starting what has become a worldwide phenomenon. The Jump is an origin story of Bungy jumping and its unsung creator Chris Sigglekow. Unearthed video footage from the 80s uncovers this amazing period of Bungy’s beginnings.

‘Dans’ – animated short film by Joel Kefali

Dans (Turkish for ‘dance’) is an animated documentary based around the storytelling of Sol, an elderly Turkish migrant now living in New Zealand. In this colourful short Sol recounts a treasured memory from his early days as a refugee spent at “The Orange” – a popular dance hall in Auckland.

 

STOP/GO – a short documentary By Greg Jennings

Be it in scorching sunlight or sideways snowfall, the workers behind the stop/go signs on our roads gain a unique insight into our home, Aotearoa. Using the natural beauty of New Zealand as the backdrop, Stop/Go shares an untold kiwi story of identity and earning an honest day’s pay.

HOMING By Andrew Scott

In one elegant shot this short documentary takes the viewer on an unusual journey through a New Zealand home on a summers day.  A peaceful work that initiates contemplation on what humans choose to have in their homes, and the natural and man-made symphony that surrounds us all.

 

What does home mean to you?

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