What's Up Wednesday

The Scruffy Bunny

The Scruffy Bunny smacks of something a bit fun and unconventional. And this is exactly what its founder, Rich Hoffman, is all about. The Scruffy Bunny is going to be Wellington’s centralised hub of improv theatre; a place that puts the spotlight on evening entertainment and daytime education. With over 20 years experience in the entertainment and food industries, Rich is amped to bring the two together to improve the world through improv!

Why do you think this campaign is important?

The Scruffy Bunny represents a much bigger goal than simply a theatre. It is going to be an education space. Our team are excited about bettering the world through improv classes (improvisation for those non-thespians out there). We know that the potential for improv to educate is endless; it teaches communication, awareness and confidence. It increases your ability to think under pressure and embrace spontaneity.

The Scruffy Bunny also represents a culture this world needs more of; “yes, and..”. Improv is based on the premise that we should always answer an idea with a “yes”. Accept whatever idea is being presented to you and, even if you detest it, add something to reframe it as a positive. The end game is to move things forward. I think improv is a wonderful metaphor for how we should live life outside the theatre as well as on the stage.  

This campaign is important because it will enable us to create an experience that transforms the Scruffy Bunny – a little pocket of the community – into the happiest place in the known universe.

What motivated you to reach out to your crowd?

I have travelled a lot – across the world and now to here in New Zealand. I have talked to countless people about my dream to create a community hub that focuses on improv. I decided to create a campaign so that all these people who got excited about my idea can now be part of making this dream come true.

The Scruffy Bunny is being built for Wellingtonians. This is another reason why we wanted to reach out to the Welly crowd; it is a hub for all of us. We want to bring the spirit of Wellington into the theatre. By pledging to this campaign, you are helping to establish a hub for life improvement through theatre and learning.

What do you have planned for the rest of the campaign – anything for us to look forward to?

We are putting out a few more videos over the final days. You can keep an eye out for the links through our PledgeMe page and also by liking our Facebook page.

Please also keep an eye on our rewards page over the next couple of days. You never know what the Scruffy Bunny might come up with!

Anything you would like to shout out to your crowd?

We love you all – thanks for following our journey! We hope that you can be a part of the campaign by pledging now. Time is ticking and we would love you to help us reach our goal. And of course, you are always welcome to come along to watch (or be in!) our shows.

You can pledge to the Scruffy Bunny Improv Hub here.

What's Up Wednesday

Our Own Ron

Art brings people together. This is something the folk that bought the Bull back to Christchurch learnt when they raised over $200,000 to make the iconic Chapman’s Homer a permanent symbol of Christchurch’s strength.

Now they are doing it again, this time with Our Own Ron. Sometime in between the two major earthquakes that rocked Canterbury, the Christchurch Art Gallery held a Ron Mueck exhibition. For a lot of people, this exhibition stands out as a last memory of the city as it was. For others, it stands out simply because of the shock reminder Ron’s sculptures give us of our own humanity.

We chatted to the Our Own Ron team to find out why Christchurch needs its own Ron.

Why do you think this campaign is important?

We have heard so many stories from people who remember “that exhibition with all the big people”. Sandwiched between two earthquakes, Ron Mueck’s exhibition was the best attended that Christchurch has ever seen. The line snaked out the door, across the gallery forecourt and around the other side!

Ron has only made 40 works in his life. And now he has agreed to make one just for Christchurch. He actually visited the city in November last year. Together with Jenny Harper (director of the Christchurch Art Gallery), Ron walked the city and felt his way through how everything was going. His experience and conversations with Jenny taught him that Christchurch is in a state of cautious optimism.

The incredible thing about this work is that even we don’t know what it is yet; noone but Ron knows! We didn’t want to have any influence over what it could be, and it will be a beautiful moment when we all find out together.  

What motivated you to reach out to your crowd?

We have run a campaign like this before, when we bought Michael Parekowhai’s bull back to Christchurch. It was incredibly successful (in fact, a PledgeMe project campaign record!). The whole city was behind the acquisition of the work.

Just like in 2013, the city is really behind getting Our Own Ron. As soon as we announced the campaign, we started getting checks in the mail. Our mission is to raise a total of $1 million. We’ve had some amazing supporters and enjoyed a great success with our annual gala dinner. Now, it is over to the great people of Christchurch to bring home Ron.

What do you have planned for the rest of the campaign – anything for us to look forward to?

Yes we do! We just released a late entry but very special reward: a limited edition Our Own Ron Vespa Sprint, thanks to CMB Motorcycles, VESPA and Mod’s Hair. No more RONning around for one lucky pledger!

We have also been holding a number of “pledge parties” throughout the campaign. We are holding our biggest one yet on Sunday night to see out the campaign.

We would love to invite all our friends, supporters and pledgers-to-be to RONdevous with us at Dux Central on Sunday from 4pm. Tickets are $25, and all proceeds go to Our Own Ron. You will be greeted with a welcome drink, free food and DJs. Kids are most welcome too! We would love everyone to come along, celebrate and show us that they are “on for Ron”.

Anything you would like to shout out to your crowd?

We would love to finish up with an enormous thank you to everyone who have gotten “on for Ron”. We would also like to ask all our supporters to spread the word that we only have four days left to get Our Own Ron!

To show that you are “on for Ron”, you can pledge to their campaign page here.

What's Up Wednesday

The Lucy Foundation: Phase Two

Meet the Lucy Foundation, a social enterprise that empowers people with disabilities through inclusive and accessible business. Last year, the Lucy Foundation ran phase one of their Coffee Project with us, and raised over $24,000 to empower five coffee-farming families in South Mexico. This year, they’re back for phase two: to increase production, and bring enough coffee back to New Zealand to enjoy.

But this is about much more than coffee. It’s about growing a business model that’s based on inclusiveness, that supports a community, and provides for income, opportunities and growth. But don’t just take it from us – we got in touch with Robbie from The Lucy Foundation to tell you all about it himself.

Why do you think this campaign’s important?

This campaign is important because disabled people make up the largest minority in the world. If you live to a good, old age, you’re going to develop at least one disability. It affects all people regardless of age, gender, class, nationality, religion or geographical location. In fact, it’s pretty much the only minority in the world you can unwittingly join at any time.

Yet, people with disabilities face higher levels of unemployment, lower levels of education and less access to healthcare than any other sector of society.

Recent results released by Statistics NZ show that disabled Kiwis are twice as likely to be unemployed in New Zealand and earn only half the average weekly income of non-disabled New Zealanders.

Disability rights are human rights. It’s what we do. It’s important. It affects us all.

What motivated you to reach out to your crowd?

In 2016, we launched a PledgeMe campaign for Phase One of the Mexico Coffee Project and thanks to the kindness of friends, family and supporters we raised nearly $25,000. Every dollar of this was used to empower coffee farming families to adopt inclusive and sustainable farming practices, bring together entire families regardless of (dis)ability, and to deliver specialty Pluma coffee to New Zealanders.

But that was just a taste of good things to come! We are again reaching out to those who know us, and those we have yet to meet, with an invite: let’s work together to expand and grow a business model that we know works. Besides, who wouldn’t want to get some pretty awesome pledge rewards from Mexico, while having a tangible impact on the environment, sustainability, and the lives of people with disabilities in New Zealand and Mexico!?

What do you have planned for the rest of the campaign – anything for us to look forward to?

A couple of weekends ago we released the first batch of ethical, sustainable and inclusive Pluma Coffee and Cascara Tea (made from the coffee cherries) in Aotearoa New Zealand. We still have a limited amount left to share with you all, which we’ll be auctioning off in the coming week. Rumour has it, boxing gloves signed by Sonny Bill Williams will also be up for grabs (swoon!)… keep an eye on our Facebook page for forthcoming details!

Anything you’d like to shout out to your crowd?

It works! Inclusive and accessible business works! We’ve proven it! Now we need to make it an actual ‘thing’. We need your help to grow business and impact, and show more people how it’s done, so they too can develop a culture of inclusion and diversity within their businesses and communities.

Support our campaign, make a pledge and tell all your friends about the importance of sustainability, inclusion, equality and diversity within business.

To pledge to The Lucy Foundation and support inclusive, accessible business, check out their page right here.

Going Walkabout in Queensland

As many of you know, PledgeMe has launched in Australia! With our experience in New Zealand crowdfunding (across project, equity and lending campaigns) and the recent changes to equity legislation here in Australia, we decided to cross the ditch.

I’ve been in Brisbane for a week now thanks to HotDesQ, and I think the best term for it is “busy in Brissie”.

I’ve met with angels, lawyers, accountants, hipsters, craft beer kids, and still seem to manage to wake up for 6am team meetings and phone calls.

I’ve pointed out typos to ASIC (they probably didn’t like that), met a bunch of awesome new friends, been to the launch of a marriage equality beer, settled into a new co-working space (Little Tokyo Two) and am slowly figuring out where I am in the city (I’ve only gotten properly lost once….).

But, most importantly, I’ve met with companies. I’ve heard where they’re at, and where they want to go next.

The Australian equity crowdfunding legislation, as it currently stands, isn’t much use for them. It currently only caters for less than 1% of Australian companies (those that are “public unlisted”). And, while companies can swap to being public unlisted, it adds a lot of compliance requirements that doesn’t make sense for a small company.

Thankfully, the Australian government listened, and are planning on extending the legislation to cover proprietary companies (which is 99% of SME’s). But, that will still take at least 6 months.

So, my plan between now and then is:

  • to get our application for an intermediary licence in and
  • to support as many companies as we can to figure out if crowdfunding makes sense for them – and what they need to do between now and then if they do decide to raise money from their crowd.

What can we offer? A wealth of experience helping companies across the ditch get ready to go out to their own crowds (not just traditional investors). We’ve seen everything from a craft brewery raise $2mil in 2 days, through to a solid haircare business top up their shareholder round with $500,000 in 90 minutes.

To launch that, I’m going for a bit of a road trip at the end of this week to meet more companies. I’ll be in:

  • Wed, 11 October – Sunshine Coast
  • Thurs, 12 October – Bundaberg
  • Fri, 13 October – Rockhampton

If you’d like to hear more about equity crowdfunding, grab a coffee, or just meet and discuss your plans send me an email on [email protected] I’d love to meet you.

What's Up Wednesday

Kai and culture: Food stories from Aotearoa

Food tells a story. And Freerange Press wants to tell the story of New Zealand’s contemporary food identity, and how it impacts our culture.

Freerange Press crowdfunded with us last year to publish Don’t Dream It’s Over: Reimagining Journalism in New Zealand. This year, they’re reaching out to their crowd again in order to publish this cultural cookbook of food stories from Aotearoa. Through essays, profiles and recipes, Kai and Culture canvasses a range of views and stories from local food cultures, experts, and chefs – but now it needs your contributions to tell all those stories. So to find out more about why you should be pledging, we had a chat to the team at Freerange Press.

Why do you think this campaign is important?

Food is such a strong part of culture and it is a great lens through which to look at ideas and issues, because everyone shares in the experience of food. We wanted to tell the story of Aoteroa’s local food cultures because it feels like a contemporary food identity is emerging – where we are confident in our produce and where we are beginning to understand our place as a Pacific and multicultural nation.

So through talking about our food culture, and the people involved in creating local food identities, we also talk about the issues that intersect with it – from the environmental impacts in producing food through to food security and resilience. A range of chefs, producers and writers share their views and stories.

This is a cultural cookbook – recipes, essays, profiles and heaps of photos – and we hope that this format invites more people to read it and engage with our food culture and its contemporary issues.

What motivated you to reach out to your crowd?

Basically we have a cash flow problem. We are printing in New Zealand, which is expensive, so we need to make some pre-sales of the book to help pay the bill (because we need to pay this before we sell books to the bookstores). So we are asking people to order a copy of the book, which they will receive hot off the press. But we are throwing in a copy of one of our classic publications to say thank you to early supporters. And all of this just in time for Christmas!

What do you have planned for the rest of the campaign – anything for us to look forward to?

We will release some behind the scenes material of the book-making, some sneak-peak content and also run a draw for some of our lovely wares. The first 60 pledgers will go in the draw to win a wee Freerange gift pack.

Anything you’d like to shout out to your crowd?

We want to thank all the early supporters for getting behind us thus far. We also want to ask people to support us – a small, independent press – to get this book to print so that we can share our local food stories with Aotearoa.

To support Freerange Press and tell Aotearoa’s food stories, pledge to their campaign page here.

Getting social; highlights from the Social Enterprise World Forum

Last week, over 1,500 people from more than 45 countries collided in the newly rebuilt heart of Christchurch for a shared purpose: to join in the conversation about social enterprise.

Akina led the bid to host the Social Enterprise World Forum in New Zealand, and (we reckon) did a pretty rad job. Over the three day event we heard from world-leading social entrepreneurs like Jan Owen, we were star struck by MC Suzy Cato and we cheered on memorable soundbites like this one from Brianne West of Ethique:

“I look forward to the day when social enterprise is no longer the minority.”

The overarching theme was “ka koroki te manu” – creating our tomorrow. This was a theme that came through many of the sessions, with speakers and delegates keeping a keen eye on how to build financially sustainable enterprises that also build a more sustainable future.

Other cool elements to the Forum: it was a “Compostable Event” (which basically means the caterers and food trucks used only completely compostable packaging and cutlery); there were 25 tours of 30 local social enterprises across Christchurch; and there was an app which featured an Facebook-esq feed plus a contact list of everyone who attended.

 

Catching up with PledgeMe community

We also bumped into a bunch of PledgeMe alumni. Here are some cool stories of what some of them have been up to since they crowdfunded:

  • Conscious Consumers ran a successful project campaign with us in 2015 to build a “Good Spend Counter”, an app that shares your values with the businesses you shop with. Since then, over 20,000 consumers and 450 retailers have signed up to the app. Conscious Consumers is currently attempting to raise $3 million to go global.
  • Cultivate Christchurch inspires young people to “live lives they value in an urban farm environment”. During the Forum, co-founder Bailey Perryman announced that Cultivate Christchurch will be launching a crowdlending campaign involving the aptly named “Broccoli Bonds” on Thursday 12 October.  
  • The Blueskin Resilient Communities Trust crowdfunded with us in 2013 to put up a wind measurement tower in Blueskin Bay. Since then, BRCT tried to gain consent for their community owned wind project, but were rejected. Manager Scott Willis shares his reflections: “It’s hard to create paradigm change, but we’ve begun the process. We’ve had a setback that has revealed the power of the status quo in New Zealand. What’s next? We’re marshalling forces because the democratisation of energy in NZ is critical if we are to build the climate solutions our world needs.”
  • Ethique is a Christchurch-based social enterprise looking to rid the world of plastic bottles by producing solid hair and beauty products. It launched its second PledgeMe campaign during the Forum, and hit headlines for crowdfunding $500k within two hours of its campaign going live.

 

What next?

Since the Social Enterprise World Forum launched in Scotland ten years ago, it has triggered unprecedented growth in social enterprise for the countries which host it. Clearly, exciting times lie ahead for New Zealand’s social enterprise movement.

Or does it? Although we left Christchurch buzzing, we recognise social enterprise doesn’t happen on its own. In fact, we wrote about the importance of spreading the impact of social enterprises in Aotearoa here. One of the easiest ways to do so is by supporting socially driven alternatives. To see who you might like to support, check out our crowdsourced list of New Zealand social enterprises.

What's Up Wednesday

The Monthly Co.

An often overlooked issue for women at risk is the lack of access they have to affordable sanitary products. But with the help of the Monthly Co, you can change all that – and get top-quality sanitary products for yourself while you’re at it!

When you subscribe to this social enterprise, they’ll deliver 100% organic tampons to your door every month – and for every order they send out to you, they’ll donate a box of tampons to women in need, through their partnership with Aviva (formerly the Christchurch Women’s Refuge). The tampons are also 100% biodegradable, which makes them better for the environment than regular synthetic or conventional cotton tampons.

But in order to launch this business, they need your help. They’re offering a range of rewards for pledgers, including pre-orders of their tampon subscriptions. We decided to get in touch with Isabelle and Josie to hear more about why you should be pledging to this social enterprise:

Why do you think this campaign is important?

When women or families are struggling to pay for rent and food, the recurring monthly cost of sanitary items such as tampons is a real burden. We know that tampons are a necessity item and unfortunately there is a group of girls and women who cannot afford them and are turning to unhygienic alternatives or missing work or school as a consequence. As a social enterprise, The Monthly Co. is all about making a positive social and environmental impact – together we can shake up the tampon industry in New Zealand. We’re on a mission to make lives more convenient for women on the go through our tampon subscriptions while also helping women and girls in need. With every order we send out to our paying subscribers, we donate a box of tampons to our charitable partner Aviva (formerly the Christchurch Womens Refuge).

What motivated you to reach out to your crowd?

Our mission is what motivated us to reach out to our crowd because we can only make The Monthly Co. a reality with the support of others who are willing to back our campaign. If we are successful in reaching our target we can order our first shipment of 100% organic tampons from Europe and start delivering tampons to your door, while also supporting our charitable partner Aviva.

What do you have planned for the rest of your campaign – anything for us to look forward to?

At the moment our first 100 pledgers go in the draw to win a $200 Cakes by Anna voucher (if you haven’t heard of Cakes by Anna – definitely worth looking up!). Down the line we have some exciting giveaways planned to keep up the campaign momentum!

Anything you’d like to shout out to your crowd?

Thank you SO much to all those that have already made a pledge, together we really can make a difference to the lives of at-risk women and girls – to those yet to the pledge, we can only make The Monthly Co. a reality with your support – pledge today!

To get pledging to The Monthly Co now, check out their campaign right here.

Social enterprise: A better way to do business

It’s time to hear from a lady who lives and breathes social enterprise. Tricia Fitzgerald has studied social enterprise for years (she’s even got a PhD in it!), and currently sits as the chair of Social Enterprise Auckland (SEA), a collaborative group of social enterprises and supporters working for sustainable social change in Auckland. She discusses the social enterprise movement and how SEA is helping to support and grow the sector in New Zealand.

Tricia

 

A much debated question: what is social enterprise and why is it important?

Social enterprise is a global movement that is steadily building momentum here in Auckland. Leaders from government, not for profit and business sectors are recognizing that social enterprise offers a unique combination of social purpose and financial independence – mixing mission with market – and it provides a new option for both customers and suppliers alike. Social enterprises are hybrid organisations that trade goods and services to achieve social, environmental, economic, and cultural outcomes. They represent a different – arguably better – way of doing business because they balance the commercial side of business with social goals or missions. In my opinion, social enterprise is going to help change the world.

If you have the choice to buy from a business that is solely commercially-focused versus one that also provides social benefits, then conscious consumers are going to choose to spend their money where it will have a positive impact. Social enterprises also provide a unique alternative to traditional social service provision. Traditionally social, environmental, economic, and cultural initiatives are developed and implemented by government, and delivered in partnership with either business or charities. Government agencies now have another option and are increasingly partnering with social enterprises to develop innovative new approaches to solving tough problems. We are now seeing long-standing social issues being addressed in proactive, sustainable and responsive ways.

 

Why was Social Enterprise Auckland created?

SEA was formed in 2012 in response to a call from Auckland Council representative, Joel Umali, to advise Council on social enterprise issues. We formally launched in 2015, and held our first event, “Beyond Purpose – Making Money Count” in July 2016. These events have become our hallmark – bringing together social entrepreneurs, supporters, funders and a variety of perspectives from public, private and community sectors to inspire, encourage and act as a collective. We’re running our next event “Creating Our Tomorrow” on Friday 22nd September as an appetiser for the upcoming Social Enterprise World Forum in Christchurch, and some tickets are still available.

 

So what do SEA care about?

Our main aims are to help grow and normalise the social enterprise sector in Auckland through providing information, connection and a public voice to social enterprises. Overall, the vision is that social enterprise becomes just another (normal) way of doing business.
It’s brilliant to see leaders like Tricia at the heart of social enterprise in New Zealand. You can become a member of SEA (for free!) to hear more about their journey, the initiatives that they’re a part of (like their upcoming social enterprise directory), and the changes that they’re helping to create in and around Auckland.

Exporting our expertise over the ditch

We’ve been watching the proposed equity crowdfunding legislation changes in Australia for a while.

 

In 2015, off the back of our second equity crowdfunding campaign, I had over 20 meetings in three days in Australia chatting to people in the know about what was coming. I wrote about it here.

At the time, I was excited about the possibility, but also a bit concerned with the almost single minded focus on “protecting mom and pop investors”, rather than supporting companies to grow.

 

It’s taken Australia a while to get their legislation across the line. From first calls for submissions in 2014 (the same year NZ launched equity crowdfunding), they’ve now announced the date that the Corporations Amendment (Crowd-sourced Funding) Act 2017 will come into effect on 29 September 2017. Last month, we provided feedback on over 300 pages of guidance notes, legislation, and templates provided by ASIC (as seen in the image….).

There are still some areas of concern:

  • How information is shared and what information companies should / shouldn’t provide – there are rules that say offer documents are not allowed to be emailed.
  • The need to be a public unlisted company, rather than a proprietary (private) company – this will be expensive for companies, and currently 99% of Australian companies are proprietary (not public).  
  • The sheer volume of guidance and regulation – it feels like over regulation to protect investors not support companies (which was my original concern)

 

If Australia over-regulates they might face the same fate as America, where unbelievably low amounts of capital were invested through crowdfunding platforms in the first year. After the regulation came into play in May 2016 only NZD $52million was invested in the first year in the whole United States of America. By comparison, New Zealand had NZD $12.4million invested through equity crowdfunding in the first year despite a population less than 2% the size of the USA.  Critics believe this is due to the cost for companies being so high due to over regulation.

 

But, despite being a bit concerned, we’ve decided the only way we can know if we want to enter the fray is to be there. So, we’re doing it. We’re expanding to Australia.

In order to do that, I’m moving. I’m heading over to Brisbane for six months to set up our Australian arm. We’re excited to see how things work over the ditch, and help as many people as possible. Why Brisbane?

 

Two reasons. First, we don’t want to be where everyone else will be competing. We want to set up our own niche, and grow from there with the support of our crowd. Sort of like how we did in it New Zealand, setting up in Wellington first before creating an office in Auckland. And, in a lot of ways, Brisbane is quite like Wellington. A smaller city comparatively, not the banking sector hub, but with a love of craft products (*cough* beer *cough*), a focus on local produce, an eclectic arts scene, and hipsters.

 

Secondly, we’ve been lucky to be selected for the HotDesq programme. That means we’ll have a ready set network, and some funding, to get set up.

 

In return, we need to help build and support the Brisbane ecosystem. Which is awesome, because that’s what we do here in New Zealand anyways. Part of my role is to actively educate and inspire entrepreneurs. And, we can’t wait to do that in Australia, taking all of the inspiration and experience from New Zealand and helping to create a new way of raising capital in Australia.

 

We think this move can only be good for PledgeMe in New Zealand: growing our reach, learning from Australia, and building a brand that helps people fund the things they care about. There are over 2.1million SME’s in Australia (compared to just under 500,000 here in New Zealand), so the opportunity is pretty clear. 

Our team will be taking on some of my responsibilities while I’m Australian based, but I will still be working with New Zealand campaigners from over the ditch. I mean, a Google Hangout from Wellington to Dunedin or Brisbane to Dunedin isn’t that much different, right?

 

If you have any tips, tricks, or folk we should definitely connect with, please comment below.

What's Up Wednesday

Tabitha Dombroski

Tabitha Dombroski has been dancing since she was 3, and has known from an early age that she wanted to be a dancer. This year, she gained the honour of being invited to continue her dance education at the prestigious John Cranko Schule in Stuttgart, Germany. But due to her family’s financial situation, Tabitha has been supporting her own dancing for the past year, rising at 5.30am each morning to work her two jobs. In order to afford to live in Stuttgart and achieve her dream, she needs the support of her crowd. So we got in touch to see why you should be helping Tabitha with the next step in her dance career.

Why do you think this campaign is important?

The campaign is extremely important to me. Its success will mean I can fully support myself for the first 3 months in Stuttgart. Without the support of others I would not be able to follow my dreams. It is such a privilege and rare opportunity to be offered to train with The John Cranko Schule. PledgeMe and this campaign has helped me so much. Through the campaign I have received not only financial help but lots of messages of love and support. I aim to be a ballet dancer in Europe and this next step makes reaching this goal that much more possible. I could not do this without PledgeMe and my generous supporters. The dream is closer then ever.

What motivated you to reach out to your crowd?

There is such a strong, tight knit dance community. Everyone knows everyone and we had spoken to a few groups of people about starting up a pledge page, and they were all so supportive.

What do you have planned for the rest of your campaign – anything for us to look forward to?

I left to London on the 28th of August and I go to Stuttgart on the 6th of September. I will be posting heaps of updates of how it’s all going. And also for the rewards, they are all starting to come together so will be sharing those too.

Anything you’d like to shout out to your crowd?

I would like to thank my crowd for their generous pledges, thoughtful comments and their love. I have felt it in spades! xx

To pledge to Tabitha’s campaign and help her achieve her dream, head over to her page right here!